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The Society for Simulation in Healthcare (SSH) has established a new award for graduating dental and dental hygiene students at The University of Texas School of Dentistry at Houston. 

“The Society for Simulation in Healthcare Student Award” will be presented annually to the UTSD student who demonstrated the highest interest, participation and performance in simulation while in dental school. The winner will be announced as part of the graduation proceedings in April or May each year.

“We’re very pleased to have SSH’s name associated with this award,” said John A. Valenza, DDS, dean of the School of Dentistry. “Simulation has become a vital and integrated part of our curricula as technology allows us to teach with more realism than ever. With this award, we can recognize students for the discipline, enthusiasm and ‘can-do’ attitudes that turn technical ability into talent.”

SSH’s mission of facilitating excellence in (multi-specialty) healthcare education, practice, and research through simulation modalities dovetails with the significant role simulation plays in the School of Dentistry’s educational programs.   

“Recognizing that simulation represents a paradigm shift in health care education, SSH promotes improvements in simulation technology, educational methods, practitioner assessment and patient safety to promote better patient care and improved patient outcomes” said SSH Past President Paul Phrampus.

Institutions involved in health care simulation are encouraged to collaborate with SSH to recognize and promote excellence in simulation education, research or practice.  If your institution is interested in an SSH-titled award – or an award or lecture named to honor an individual, company or organization – contact Interim Executive Director Jenn Manos at jmanos@ssih.org.

Established in 2004 by professionals using simulation for education, testing, and research in healthcare, SSH membership is comprised of all medical disciplines, researchers, educators and developers from around the globe.  SSH fosters the improvement and application of simulation-based modalities such as human patient simulators, virtual reality, standardized patients and task trainers. For more information, go to www.ssih.org.

 

 

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